Study Detail

COVID-HEART

Demographic, multi-morbidity and genetic impact on myocardial involvement and its recovery from COVID-19: a UK national study (The COVID-HEART Study)

Status: Open

Type: Observational

Funder: not available

Sponsor: Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

CI: Prof John Greenwood

IRAS-Number: 285147

CPMS-ID: 46129

Approval Date: 04 June 2020

Summary:

Up to 1 in 5 patients hospitalised by COVID-19 have evidence of heart muscle injury as measured from a blood test. This is associated with a high death rate. Using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan (a type of scan that uses strong magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of the inside of the heart) we will look at how often, and in what way, the heart becomes damaged, and how the heart recovered 6 months later. We need to know how heart muscle damage and recovery is affected by age, sex, ethnic group and other medical conditions (such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and narrowing of blood vessels), as these are also known to be associated with high death rates. We also want to see if we can improve the diagnosis of viral heart damage from a simple electrocardiogram (ECG) (a test that is used to check the heart's rhythm and electrical activity). This could save patients having invasive heart tests which can be uncomfortable, are expensive and carry a small risk of serious complications and may put healthcare staff at increased risk of exposure to COVID-19. We have established a large group of leading UK academic centres which have committed to work together. Recruitment will be linked to the Post-hospitalisation COVID-19 study: a national consortium to understand and improve long-term health outcomes (P-HOSP:COVID-19 Study) which aims to recruit 10,000 patients, 5000 of whom we aim to recruit to these additional research procedures including imaging.

Description:

Up to 1 in 5 patients hospitalised by COVID-19 have evidence of heart muscle injury as measured from a blood test. This is associated with a high death rate. Using an MRI scan of the heart we aim to investigate how often, and in what way, the heart becomes damaged, and how the heart recovers 6 months later. We need to know how heart muscle damage and recovery is affected by age, sex, ethnicity and other medical conditions (such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and narrowing of blood vessels), as these are also known to be associated with high death rates. We also want to see if we can improve the diagnosis of viral heart damage from a simple ECG, which may save patients having invasive heart tests which can be uncomfortable, are expensive and carry a small risk of serious complications and may put healthcare staff at increased risk of exposure to COVID-19. We have established a large UK consortium of leading UK academic centres from the NIHR-BHF partnership and the British Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (BSCMR) Research Group, which have committed to work together. Recruitment will be linked to the Post-hospitalisation COVID-19 study: a national consortium to understand and improve long-term health outcomes (P-HOSP:COVID-19 Study) which aims to recruit 10,000 patients, 5000 of which are expected to consent to additional research procedures including imaging.

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