This site is optimised for modern browsers. For the best experience, please use Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, or Microsoft Edge.

Beta Site: This is a new site which is still under development. We welcome your feedback, which will help improve it.

Feedback form

NIHR Senior Fellowship Potential Supervisors

 

Contents

NIHR Senior Fellowship award holders

Host/Individual

Organisation

Contact

Areas able to support

Lucy Smith

University of Leicester

lucy.smith@le.ac.uk

I am able to support medical statistics or mixed methods research particularly relating to improving maternal and infant health such as statistical methodology around the measurement and monitoring of adverse pregnancy outcomes, qualitative research to understand parents’ and clinicians’ experiences of pregnancy loss, neonatal mortality and preterm birth and the use of large-scale routine health data to monitor and reduce inequalities in health.

Hareth Al-Janabi

University of Birmingham

H.AlJanabi@bham.ac.uk

Methods support: Health economics, especially supporting applications relating to:

  • Measurement of quality of life, wellbeing, and preferences;

  • The methodology of economic evaluation

  • Economics of mental health · Informal/family care

  • Qualitative and other innovative research methods in health economics

Karla Hemming

University of Birmingham

K.hemming@bham.ac.uk

I am a statistician with an interest in cluster randomised trials. My research interests range from statistical (including sample size and analysis issues) to the more practical (including reporting, bias and ethical issues).

Lucy Selman

University of Bristol

Lucy.selman@bristol.ac.uk

Methods: qualitative and mixed methods (including qualitative methods in intervention development and evaluation e.g. in RCTs) Research interests: palliative and end of life care, advanced/progressive chronic disease, treatment decision-making and care planning

Tracey Sach

University of East Anglia

T.Sach@uea.ac.uk

I am interested in supervising someone who would like to learn about economic evaluation and/or outcome measurement. I have a particular interest in these methodologies as applied to dermatology, rehabilitation and older people.

Emma Frew

University of Birmingham

e.frew@bham.ac.uk

Area of expertise: Health economics and the application of economics to facilitate public health decision making. Main research interest is in using economics to inform policy to tackle childhood obesity.

Diana Baralle

University of Southampton

D.Baralle@soton.ac.uk

Specialty: I am a Clinical academic in genetics and genomics. I work on finding new disease gene associations for rare diseases and deep phenotypic of them. My lab. Is involved in bringing RNA and splicing into diagnostics using wet lab, RNA seq and bioinformatics, expanding on functional genomics.

Christian Mallen

Keele University

c.d.mallen@keele.ac.uk

Specialty: I am a Clinical academic in genetics and genomics. I work on finding new disease gene associations for rare diseases and deep phenotypic of them. My lab. Is involved in bringing RNA and splicing into diagnostics using wet lab, RNA seq and bioinformatics, expanding on functional genomics.

Gisli Jenkins

The University of Nottingham

Gisli.Jenkins@nottingham.ac.uk

Medical stats and bioinformatics Clinical trial design Health economics

Rupert Pearse

Queen Mary, University of London

r.pearse@qmul.ac.uk

We can offer particular experience in the day to day conduct of clinical trials in areas of acute medical care such as surgery, anaesthesia, trauma and emergency medicine. Our particular strength is in applied health research including pragmatic trials and mixed methods research which combine qualitative and quantitative methods. We are affiliated to the Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit at QMUL allowing co-supervision by an appropriate methodological expert if needed.

Niina Kolehmainen

Newcastle University

Niina.Kolehmainen@newcastle.ac.uk

Strong methods expertise in the development and evaluation of complex nondrug interventions. Our expertise spans across clinical groups ages from children to adults to ageing, and I have access to co-supervisors with complementary clinical expertise as required.

Esther Crawley

University of Bristol

Esther.Crawley@bristol.ac.uk

Paediatric trials and paediatric trial methodology, the epidemiology of complex disorders, qualitative research in children and their parents.

Daniel PrietoAlhambra

University of Oxford

daniel.prietoalhambra@ndorms.ox.ac.uk

Methods/areas of interest: I am Theme Lead for Observational Research at the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford. I have expertise in the analysis and interpretation of routinely collected data including national and international electronic medical records, registries, and audit/s data for research. Please visit my webpage for more details: https://www.ndorms.ox.ac.uk/team/daniel-prieto-alhambra

Cathy Williams

University of Bristol

Cathy.Williams@bristol.ac.uk

As an academic Paediatric Ophthalmologist I would be able to support applications related to ophthalmology, vision science generally and some aspects of paediatrics. I have experience in a range of epidemiological studies (cohort, cross-sectional, rct) and now am using qualitative methods as well.

Owen Arthurs

Great Ormond Street Hospital

Owen.Arthurs@gosh.nhs.uk

Fetal medicine and children (Bioinformatics and modelling, and qualitative research)

Thomas Jaki

University of Lancaster

t.jaki@lancaster.ac.uk

Bayesian and adaptive methods for clinical trials; Extrapolation

Sian Taylor-Phillips

University of Warwick

s.taylor-phillips@warwick.ac.uk

I specialise in evaluating population screening programmes, such as the NHS cancer screening programmes (Breast, Cervical and Bowel), newborn blood spot screening and antenatal screening. I evaluate proposed new screening programmes and screening tests, through primary research such as observational studies and randomised controlled trials, and through systematic review of the published literature. My particular specialism is breast cancer screening.

Céire Costelloe

Imperial College

ceire.costelloe@imperial.ac.uk

1. Routine dataset

2. Causal inference

3. Natural experiments and quasi experimental design

4. Interest in infection in particular

Lorna Fraser

University of York

Lorna.fraser@york.ac.uk

My areas of expertise lie in the secondary data analyses of routinely collected health and administrative datasets especially, but not exclusively, in areas of child health research.

Carsten Flohr

Kings College London

carsten.flohr@kcl.ac.uk

Main research projects:

  • Co-ordinating Centre (CI: C Flohr) for the UK-Irish Atopic eczema Systemic TherApy Register (A-STAR), https://astar-register.org/;

  • Lead site for the NIHR-funded Treatment of Severe Atopic Eczema in children (TREAT) trial (CI: C Flohr), http://treat-trial.org.uk/;

  • Lead site for the NIHR-funded SOFTER trial (CI: C Flohr) to investigate if water softeners can prevent atopic eczema in early life in high risk children (softertrial.org.uk).

  • We also have a commercial trials and a skin microbiome research programme.

Available training: design and conduct of observational and interventional dermatology studies, related statistical and bioinformatics analyses, including the handling of microbiome datasets from our clinical trials.

The postholder would benefit from established collaborations within King’s College London (Prof Janet Peacock, of Medical Statistics and NIHR Senior Investigator,

https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/janet.peacock.html; Dr Sophia Tsoka, Reader in Bioinformatics

https://www.kcl.ac.uk/nms/depts/informatics/people/atoz/tsokas.aspx) and externally (Prof Andrea Manca, health economist University of York; https://www.york.ac.uk/che/staff/research/andrea-manca/).

Christopher Millet

Imperial College London

c.millett@imperial.ac.uk

Using quasi-experimental study designs to evaluate public health policy, including tobacco, nutrition, transport and health systems research

Rebecca Kearney

University of Warwick

R.S.Kearney@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Kearney is an NIHR senior award holder, associate director and clinical triallist within Warwick Clinical Trials Unit. Main expertise is leading the design and delivery of randomised controlled trials evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of complex interventions in health care. Collaborating with senior health economists, statisticians and other clinical triallist in this academic environment Dr Kearney would be able to co-supervise potential applicants wanting to develop expertise in any of these areas.

Richard MeiserStedman

University of East Anglia

r.meiser-stedman@uea.ac.uk

I am a clinical psychologist who leads trials of complex interventions, i.e. psychological therapies for emotional disorders, particularly in young people. I also have interested in interventions with parents and low intensity intervention, e.g internet-delivered treatments for mental health.

Nuala McGrath

University of Southampton

N.McGrath@soton.ac.uk

Medical statistics (as supervisor)

Clinical trial design (as supervisor)

Operational research (as supervisor)

Modelling (as supervisor)

Mixed methods (as co-supervisor)

I have worked in HIV and more broadly sexual health and infectious disease research since 1989, first as a biostatistician supporting clinical trials at Harvard School of Public Health in the USA, and later in clinical trials and epidemiological research in Africa. I have worked for almost 30 years in biostatistics, epidemiology, public health and operational research.

My expertise in intervention research, combined with my extensive experience in designing and managing studies in Africa is recognised internationally. This is evidenced by my membership of (i) the Steering Committee of NIMH funded Project Accept, and (ii) the Steering Committee of the ANRS TasP Trial and (iii) the NIHR UK PANTHEON steering committee.

My research excellence and expertise in the conduct and analysis of HIV clinical trials is also evidenced by invitations to be statistician for the Independent Data Safety and Management Boards of two international HIV clinical trials. I also served on the Malawian National Ethics Committee. I am a member of the International AIDS Society and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population

Katherine Woolf

University College London

k.woolf@ucl.ac.uk

I can support a project using multivariate statistical techniques to analyse largescale longitudinal administrative data on medical students and doctors; for example my current research is looking at how medical school choice and application success varies by social background (www.ukmacs.wordpress.com ). The studentship would be co-supervised by Dr Henry Potts who is Deputy Director of UCL’s Centre for Health Informatics & Multiprofessional Education and a chartered statistician (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/chime/people/pottsh )

Richard Dobson

Kings College London

richard.j.dobson@kcl.ac.uk

Richard Dobson's research focuses on the use of data (e.g. omics, electronic health records, smartphones and wearables) to transform the delivery of healthcare by addressing some of the fundamental uncertainties of clinical medicine: How do we diagnose disease and its sub-types? Is this intervention effective? How do we personalise care? The research has required the extensive use of computational approaches as such machine learning, the creation of software tools, development of a hospital development environments and large private cloud infrastructure to enable integration of patient datasets.

 

UKCRC registered trial units

Host/Individual

Organisation

Contact

Areas able to support

Julia Brown

Leeds Institute of Clinical Trials Research

j.m.b.brown@leeds.ac.uk

1) Complex interventions trial design and analysis: Supervisors Julia Brown, Amanda Farrin, Dr Rebecca Walwyn

2) Design of experiments:Supervisors Julia Brown, Dr Rebecca Walwyn

3) Early-phase cancer trial designs: Supervisors Julia Brown, Dr Sarah Brown

4) Adaptive trial design and analysis: Supervisors Julia Brown, Dr David Cairns, Dr Dena Howard

5) Surrogate outcome measure development and evaluation: Julia Brown, Dr David Cairns, Dr Sarah Brown

6) Applied health informatics / routine data alongside clinical trials

a) In cancer: Supervisors Julia Brown, Dr David Cairns

b) In complex intervention evaluationSupervisors: Julia Brown, Amanda Farrin

Gillian Lancaster

Keele Clinical Trials Unit

g.lancaster@keele.ac.uk

Biostatistics in randomised trials

Methods of pilot and feasibility trials

Prognosis research

Stratified care trial design and methods

Systematic review methods including IPD metaanalysis

Big data / electronic health record research and epidemiology

James Capenter

MRC Clinical Trials Unit - University College London

j.carpenter@ucl.ac.uk

The CTU has a strong, programme of methodological activity and can support a wide range of methodology relative to the design, analysis and conduct clinical trials. This includes novel multi-arm multi-stage designs and non-inferioirity designs; meta-analysis methodology; methodology for missing trial outcomes and effective use of routine electronic health records in trials.

In addition, we are closely linked to both the MSc in clinical trials at UCL, and the MSc in medical statistics at the LSHTM, and already provide projects and supervision for students in both programmes.

Caroline Murphy

King's Clinical Trials Unit

0207 848 5273

1. Trials of complex interventions: quality control and adaptive designs

2. Efficient development of databases

3. Long term follow up

4. Efficacy designs to reduce non compliance

5. Trials within cohort studies

Ann Marie Swart

Norwich Clinical Trials Unit

A.Swart@uea.ac.uk

We have a Health Economics MSc and are able to offer training in health economic evaluation alongside clinical trials (Jenny Whitty and David Turner). We can also offer an MSc in health research methods alongside broad training in trial design and delivery (Matthew Hammond). We have experts in process evaluation and qualitative methods and can provide practical training in these areas (Jamie Murdoch). We have expertise in complex interventions, drug and device trials.

Anna Maria Geretti

Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) Clinical Trials Unit

A.Geretti@bsms.ac.uk

The area that we will be able to support is translational research in the area of virology / infectious diseases - with a focus on blood borne viruses (HIV and viral hepatitis) - and including a Global Health aspect. The possible applications span field work (including point of care diagnostics and outreach initiatives to bring testing to hard-to-reach populations), epidemiology and statistics (including systematic reviews and meta-analyses), identification of biomarkers of disease and treatment outcomes (including laboratory sciences in the area of virology), database management, research methodologies, research governance and ethics, networking and research partnerships, and liaisons with industrial partners.

Chris Metcalfe

Bristol Randomised Trials Collaboration

Chris.Metcalfe@bristol.ac.uk

The Bristol Randomised Trials Collaboration has strengths in the design, conduct and analysis of pragmatic trials of interventions in clinical areas including public health, primary care, oncology, community psychiatry, child and adolescent health, neurology, and urology. We work with a broad team of methodologists, who are experienced in supervising pre-doctoral, doctoral and post-doc research fellows in the fields of medical statistics, health economics, and clinical trial design. We work closely with the Bristol Clinical Trials and Evaluation Unit, under the umbrella of the Bristol Trials Centre, allowing opportunities for fellows to work with senior methodologists across the two units.

Chris Rogers

Bristol Clinical Trials and Evaluation Unit

chris.rogers@bristol.ac.uk

We are a clinical trials unit with a particular interest in conducted in a hospital setting, including surgery. The fellow would join a team of methodologists (statisticians, trials, health economists) with extensive experience in the design, conduct and analysis of trials. The fellow would have the opportunity to be gain experience in all aspects of the life-cycle of a trial and in the use of routine data (e.g. hospital episode statistics) in a trial context.

Chris Partlett

Nottingham Clinical Trials Unit

Chris.Partlett@nottingham.ac.uk

Contact for information

Dan Hind

Sheffield Clinical Trials Unit

d.hind@sheffield.ac.uk

Contact for information

David Harrison

Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre

 

Contact for information

David Torgerson

York Trials Unit

david.torgerson@york.ac.uk

We are happy to support Fellowships in: Medical Statistics; Clinical Trial Design; Mixed Methods and Qualitative Research

Ly Mee Yu

Primary Care Clinical Trials Unit, part of the Oxford Primary Care and Vaccines Collaborative Clinical Trials Unit

ly-mee.yu@phc.ox.ac.uk

Contact for information

Nick Freemantle

Comprehensive Clinical Trials Unit at University College London

nicholas.freemantle@ucl.ac.uk

CCTU is happy to act as a host for these fellowships (and we have experience of other similar schemes such as in mental health research). We have particular support to offer in statistics and operations across the range of trial designs (phase 1 through 4). A suitable fellow could be involved with the development of specific projects to provide relevant experience of all aspects of the statistics and operations of clinical trials.

Gareth Griffiths

Southampton Clinical Trials Unit

G.O.Griffiths@soton.ac.uk

Contact for information

Gavin Murphy

Leicester Clinical Trials Unit

gjm19@le.ac.uk

Contact for information

Nadine Foster

Keele Clinical Trials Unit

n.foster@keele.ac.uk

Contact for information

Simon Gates

Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit- Birmingham

 

Contact for information

Siobhan Creanor

Peninsula Clinical Trials Unit University of Plymouth

siobhan.creanor@plymouth.ac.uk

Contact for information

Apostolos Fakis

Derby Clinical Trials Unit

apostolos.fakis@nhs.net

Derby CTSU would be very pleased to host such a Fellowship and we would be able to provide support in the areas of Medical Statistics, Clinical Trial Design and Operational Research.

Victoria Cornelius

Imperial Clinical Trials Unit

v.cornelius@imperial.ac.uk

Dr Victoria Cornelius would be pleased to supervise fellows who are interested in undertaking training and projects in clinical trials, network meta-analysis, Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis and drug safety. Clinical areas include including dermatology, allergy, asthma, critical care and mental health. Fellows interested in learning more about ‘digital trials’, both as an intervention and the use of routinely collected data in trial are also encouraged.

Professor Toby Prevost would be pleased to supervise fellows interested in undertaking projects in statistical methods for repeated measures in clinical trials. He works across a number of clinical areas including ophthalmology, cancer, surgery and cardiovascular studies.

Vikki Hughes

Papworth Trials Unit Collaboration

victoria.hughes1@nhs.net

We would be willing and able to support fellows in Medical Statistics, Clinical Trial Design, and Health Economics. Our Supervisors would include Dr Sofia Villar (Statistician) and Prof Julia Fox-Rushby (Health Economics).

Xinxue Liu

Oxford Vaccine group, part of the Oxford Primary Care and Vaccines Collaborative Clinical Trials Unit

xinxue.liu@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk

Contact for information

Irwin Nazareth Greta Rait

Priment Clinical Trials Unit at University College London

i.nazareth@ucl.ac.uk/g.rait@ucl.ac.uk

Contact for information

Carrol Gamble

Liverpool Clinical Trials Collaborative

 

Statistics, Clinical Trials, Health Informatics, Core Outcome Set Methods

Sandra Eldridge

Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit

zainab.ali@qmul.ac.uk

The Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit is a UK Clinical Research Collaboration [http://www.ukcrc.org/] (UKCRC) registered, and National Institute for Health Research [https://www.nihr.ac.uk/] (NIHR) funded unit at the forefront of the science and execution of pragmatic clinical trials [https://www.qmul.ac.uk/pctu/pragmatic-clinicaltrials/#d.en.379384] with direct relevance for practice. We work across many different clinical areas with a particular focus on primary care [https://www.qmul.ac.uk/pctu/about-us/clinicalstrengths-and-studies/primary-care/], mental health [https://www.qmul.ac.uk/pctu/about-us/clinicalstrengths-and-studies/mental-health/], women's health [https://www.qmul.ac.uk/pctu/aboutus/clinical-strengths-and-studies/womens-health/], colorectal surgery [https://www.qmul.ac.uk/pctu/about-us/clinicalstrengths-and-studies/colorectal-surgery/] We have specific methodological strengths in cluster randomised trials, stepped wedge designs, trials within cohorts, re-randomisation, and pilot and feasibility studies.

 

NIHR Senior Investigators

Host/Individual

Organisation

Contact

Areas able to support

Andrew Farmer

University of Oxford

AndrewFarmer@phc.ox.ac.uk

Farmer is an academic primary care physician with a research focus on improving care for people with long term conditions (including diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) through improving diagnosis, monitoring and treatment. His research covers the role of digital health technology. He works with Dr Tom Fanshawe who is a senior medical statistician with additional expertise in evidence synthesis including meta-analysis. Dr Fanshawe would be a senior member of the supervisory team.

Jane Sandall

Kings College London

jane.sandall@kcl.ac.uk

I am happy to host applicants working in the fields of pregnancy and birth/maternity care.

Judith Bliss

Institute of Cancer Research

judith.bliss@icr.ac.uk

Methodology interests are focussed within the contemporary cancer trials arena and include i) ensuring efficient trial conduct and robust designs acceptable to patients ii) incorporation of biomarkers into trials and specifically the potential to develop intermediate biomarker endpoints within a time to event context and also iii) the use of routine data within the cancer trials context.

Sandra Eldridge

Barts and the London Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit

gppc-admin@qmul.ac.uk

My areas of interest are clinical trials, especially trials that aim to test how complex interventions work in the real world. Within that area, I have particular expertise in cluster randomised trials and pilot and feasibility studies.

Jonathan Sterne

University of Bristol

jonathan.sterne@bristol.ac.uk

medical statistics, clinical trial design or bioinformatics

Adrienne Flanagan

University College London

a.flanagan@ucl.ac.uk

The co-supervisor would be Dr Nischalan Pillay, a CRUK Clinician Scientist based at UCL Cancer Institute, and Dr Peter Van Loo, at the Crick Institute who would support the training.

briefly describing the methods/areas you would be able to support: Genomic Medicine/ molecular pathology: the successul individual would join a multidisciplinary team based at UCL Cancer Institute, and the Crick Institute. The Fellowship would provide opportunities to learn how to interpret genomic data (mostly sarcoma), to which we have access in substantial amounts, in the context of clinical treatment. The data should explain the development of resistance to therapeutics and progression of disease. Moreover, the comprehensive cataloguing of genetic alterations in sarcoma will be a critical resource which would allow pharmaceutical companies, chemists and pharmacologists to develop new drug development strategies, which will in turn increase opportunities for clinical trials. The individual will be exposed to a multidisciplinary approach to sarcoma research. All of the skills are transferrable.

Paula Williamson

University of Liverpool

P.R.Williamson@liverpool.ac.uk

Statistics, Clinical Trials, Health Informatics, Core Outcome Set Methods

Philip Bath

University of Nottingham

Philip.Bath@nottingham.ac.uk

medical statistics, clinical trial design or bioinformatics

Peter Bower

University of Manchester

peter.bower@manchester.ac.uk

Methods for analysing large observational databases of electronic health records. and methods on pooling results from studies in a meta-analysis

Martin Orrell

University of Nottingham

M.Orrell@nottingham.ac.uk

health services research, trials, measure development, complex interventions, needs and quality of life

Rosalind Raine

University College London

n.pashayan@ucl.ac.uk

Mixed methods applied research; health economics (including health econometric evaluation/causal inference in health services research); applied health service statistics; cancer modelling, early detection and early diagnosis research; organisational/ management research; public health & health services research

Ian Hall

University of Nottingham

Ian.Hall@nottingham.ac.uk

Selected areas of expertise: bio-informatics, genetic epidemiology, functional genomics, respiratory medicine, UK Biobank. As director of the NIHR Nottingham BRC I can also help facilitate interactions with other key researchers

Stephen Walters

University of Sheffield

s.j.walters@sheffield.ac.uk

Medical statistics

Clinical Trial Design

Jane Apperley

Imperial College London

J.apperley@imperial.ac.uk

My own interests are in haematological malignancies and stem cell transplantation. We can offer experience in clinical trial methodology, database management for prospective and retrospective studies with support from a dedicated biostatistician and also long term survivorship studies. If a more lab based project is of interest then we have many opportunities in leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma biology, and in the practicalities of human stem cell manipulation and processing.

Jonathan Mant

University of Cambridge

jm677@medschl.cam.ac.uk

Mant is leading a large programme of research on screening for atrial fibrillation. This provides opportunities for aspiring methodologists interested in: conduct of randomised controlled trials in primary care; qualitative research methods; health economic evaluation; systematic reviews. An experienced methodologist in the relevant discipline would be assigned as supervisor to the Fellow

Peter Griffiths

University of Southampton

peter.griffiths@soton.ac.uk

Health economics

Statistics

Operational Research

Willem Ouwehand

University of Cambridge

who1000@cam.ac.uk

Contact for information

Steve Goodacre Steven Julious

University of Sheffield

s.goodacre@sheffield.ac.uk

s.goodacre@sheffield.ac.uk

We are interested in methods to improve the efficiency of clinical trials to allow better spend of research money while also maintaining the quality of the data being used to inform decisions. Previous projects have researched how better use adaptive designs in emergency medicine trials and also methods to assess the statistical futility of studies and we have successfully supported applicants to NIHR doctoral fellowships. We would like to build on this work using applied case studies to develop easily applied methods that could be applied in trials funded by NIHR trials as well as to develop candidates so that they can prepared for a doctoral application.

Irwin Nazareth

University College London

i.nazareth@ucl.ac.uk

The focus of the methodological support would be trial based economic evaluations, particularly in areas related to mental health and primary care. The applicant would be based in Priment Clinical Trials Unit and hence would be exposed to a range of trial processes that will assist in their understanding of trial design and conduct as it relates to health economics

Sam Leary

Andy Ness

University of Bristol

s.d.leary@bristol.ac.uk

s.d.leary@bristol.ac.uk

We can offer a range of statistical projects linked to our ongoing programme of clinical nutrition research (for more details see http://www.uhbristol.nhs.uk/research-innovation/ourresearch/bristol-nutrition-bru/).

Phil Quirke

University of Leeds

p.quirke@leeds.ac.uk

We are able to support working either alone or in partnership with our team in a range of areas:

Data informatics - Morris is an international leader in the use of Big Data to improve outcomes in bowel cancer https://medicinehealth.leeds.ac.uk/medicine/staff/621/-eva-morris projects can be either purely data analytics or linked to bioinformatics. Bioinformatics - Dr Henry Wood, Senior Research Fellow https://medicinehealth.leeds.ac.uk/medicine/staff/897/dr-henry-wood, projects can be based bowel cancer and also linking molecular data to big data for impactful molecular epidemiology. We are also undertaking investigations of the microbiome and projects in this area are also available. We also have access to the 100,000 genomes GECIP data on colorectal cancer. We are generating micro biome data n the NIHR INTACT trial looking at the role of the micro biome in anastomotic leakage with Prof Jayne, NIHR Research .

Ibrahim Abubakar

University College London

i.abubakar@ucl.ac.uk

My research programme is in infectious disease epidemiology with NIHR funded work in tuberculosis and hepatitis C. As a head of a multidisciplinary academic department (UCL Institute for Global Health – www.ucl.ac.uk/igh), we have several methodologists within our units (health economists, modellers, statisticians and qualitative researchers) who will co-supervise projects. I would be delighted to explore potential projects with applicants who are interested in any of these areas.

Ara Darzi

Kelsey Flott

Steve McAtee

Imperial College London

k.flott14@imperial.ac.uk

s.mcateer@imperial.ac.uk

Our team could provide supervision in clinical trial design, health services research and both qualitative and quantitative approaches to healthcare evaluation.

Anne Barton

University of Manchester

Anne.Barton@manchester.ac.uk

I would be able to support applicants interested in the following areas through co-supervision with expert methodologists in the areas: Bioinformatics Biostatistics Health Economics

Avan Sayer

University of Newcastle

avan.sayer@newcastle.ac.uk

We would be interested in supporting pre-doctoral fellows who wish to focus on methods to improve trial design and conduct for older people. Potential areas of work include innovation and refinement of outcome measures for trials in sarcopenia and frailty, designing better ways to recruit and retain older people in clinical trials, and working with older people to optimise information on trial participation and on dissemination of results.

This would be in collaboration with Miles Witham, of Trials for Older People at Newcastle University who is a methodology expert in clinical trials.

Anne Forster

University of Leeds

A.Forster@leeds.ac.uk

The focus of the Academic Unit of Elderly Care and Rehabilitation, University of Leeds (based in Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust) is in applied health research, particularly in the development and evaluation of complex interventions in older people and people after stroke.

We utilise mixed-methods to inform intervention development, this includes Cochrane systematic reviews, big data analysis, and qualitative exploration. Testing of interventions is undertaken by large randomised controlled trials with associated process and economic evaluation.

We have a large portfolio of studies relating to frailty, this includes work associated with the Electronic Frailty Index (eFI), development of which was led from our Unit, and the growing Community Ageing Research Study 75+ (CARE75+) a national cohort study of community-dwelling older people (≥75 years). In stroke we have a portfolio of studies addressing the longer-term outcome for people and their caregivers. Working closely with the University of Leeds Trials Unit ( Amanda Farrin) we have undertaken two of the world’s largest stroke rehabilitation trials.

Douglas Higgs Angela Hamblin

University of Oxford

Liz.rose@imm.ox.ac.uk

Angela.Hamblin@ouh.nhs.uk

We are interested in studying the molecular defects that occur in patients with myelodysplasia (a form pf pre-leukaemia) and how these mutations affect blood cell parameters. Our primary technologies involve DNA sequence analysis including whole genome analysis, the analysis of whole blood cell parameters, and functional studies of gene regulation. We would also include the evaluation of patient records and the construction of a multi-national database to enable us to correlate genotype and phenotype.

Fang Gao Smith

University of Birmingham

F.GaoSmith@bham.ac.uk

Systematic review & meta-analysis;

Clinical trial design: adaptive trial design,

Bayesian method, Step Wedge; Mixed method with qualitative research;

Economic evaluation;

Health service research

Anne Forster

University of Leeds

a.forster@leeds.ac.uk

The focus of the Academic Unit of Elderly Care and Rehabilitation, University of Leeds (based in Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust) is in applied health research, particularly in the development and evaluation of complex interventions in older people and people after stroke.

We utilise mixed-methods to inform intervention development, this includes Cochrane systematic reviews, big data analysis, and qualitative exploration. Testing of interventions is undertaken by large randomised controlled trials with associated process and economic evaluation.

We have a large portfolio of studies relating to frailty, this includes work associated with the Electronic Frailty Index (eFI), development of which was led from our Unit, and the growing Community Ageing Research Study 75+ (CARE75+) a national cohort study of community-dwelling older people (≥75 years). In stroke we have a portfolio of studies addressing the longer-term outcome for people and their caregivers. Working closely with the University of Leeds Trials Unit ( Amanda Farrin) we have undertaken two of the world’s largest stroke rehabilitation trials.

Mary Dixon-Woods

University of Cambridge

mary.dixon-woods@thisinstitute.cam.ac.uk

supervision in methodological development for mixed-method primary research, mixed-method evidence synthesis, core indicator set development, citizen science, and programme evaluation

Robin Murray Daniel Stahl

Kings College London

robin.murray@kcl.ac.uk

robin.murray@kcl.ac.uk

Together with Prof Daniel Stahl (Department of Biostatistics and Health Informatics), we offer a methodology training programme in prediction modelling and personalized medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London. The fellow will have the opportunity to be trained as a modern data scientist statistician by attending the MSc in Statistical Modelling and Health Informatics. Within a team of psychiatrists and statisticians, the successful applicant will gain experience to apply statistical and machine learning methods to develop prediction models of the risk to develop psychosis and future outcome after treatment (Personalised or stratified medicine). Unlike other prediction models, we will aim to develop models which allow understanding why a person was predicted to be at risk. This information allows adapting interventions better to the individual and enables developing new prevention and intervention strategies.

John Strang Kimberley Goldsmith

Kings College London

John.strang@kcl.ac.uk

kimberley.goldsmith@kcl.ac.uk

I would like to offer a methodology training programme in collaboration with Dr Kimberley Goldsmith at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London. The programme will focus on using causal modelling to answer questions of interest in the study of heroin addiction treatments. We have data already with evidence of effectiveness, but we need now to investigate nature and direction of causality. The fellow will have the opportunity to attend the MSc in Applied Statistical Modelling and Health Informatics in the Biostatistics & Health Informatics Department to be trained as a data scientist and statistician. The fellow will also have opportunities to study causal questions of interest in large trials of contingency management for addiction, such as ConMan and PRAISe. This would include methods such as mediation analysis to understand how contingency management has effects on important outcomes, and instrumental variable and other methods to study aspects of treatment process and adherence. The results of such analyses will empirically inform targeted treatment refinement. Data on other types of addiction management strategies will also be available to the fellow.

Jane Blazeby

University of Bristol

J.M.Blazeby@bristol.ac.uk

Specifically we are able to support applicants with an interest in applied qualitative and/or quantitative methodology. We have extensive experience of applying these methodologies in a clinical trials setting, with a strong focus on trials in a surgical setting

Allan Young

Kimberley Goldsmith

Kings College London

allan.young@kcl.ac.uk

kimberley.goldsmith@kcl.ac.uk

Clinical trials in mood disorders

Ulrike Schmidt Sabine Landau

Kings College London

ulrike.schmidt@kcl.ac.uk

sabine.landau@kcl.ac.uk

We could support the following areas/methods: Research in Eating Disorders, development and evaluation of treatments for Anorexia Nervosa, methods for mental health research, clinical trials design and conduct, medical statistics, statistical modelling including longitudinal modelling or structural equation modelling.

The successful candidate could attend the “MSc in Applied Statistical Modelling and Health Informatics” run by the Department of Biostatistics and Health informatics here at KCL

Phillippa Garety Richard Emsley

Kings College London

Richard.emsley@kcl.ac.uk

Methods/areas: Medical statistics and clinical trials, with particular applications to mental health. In particular, this includes statistical methods for causal inference and efficacy and mechanisms evaluation, design and analysis of randomised trials of complex interventions in mental health, and trial designs and associated analysis methods in precision medicine. These methods would be applied to ongoing clinical work in psychosis including the SlowMo trial (http://slowmotherapy.co.uk/ ) and AVATAR (https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/avatar-project/index.aspx) which are led by Prof Garety.

Further details of supervisors:

PhilippaGarety: https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/philippagarety(8fdc9df3-3bb3-40f5-b4fe-533aefdf95f7)/biography.html

Richard Emsley: https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/richard.emsley.html

Til Wykes

Daniel Stahl

Kings College London

til.wykes@kcl.ac.uk

daniel.r.stahl@kcl.ac.uk

Together with Prof Daniel Stahl (Department of Biostatistics and Health Informatics), we offer a methodology training programme in prediction modelling and personalized medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London. The fellow will be trained as a data scientist and statistician by attending the MSc in Statistical Modelling and Health Informatics. Within our team of clinical psychologists and statisticians, the fellow has the option to apply modern statistical and machine learning methods in projects about monitoring mood using wearables and treatment response in patients with schizophrenia. The projects involve large datasets where this sort of prediction modelling would be very useful to detect features which help us to understand treatment response and potential relapse signatures to provide the basic elements for tailoring treatment. These sorts of techniques are vital in mental health where the monitoring of patient outcomes and treatment response rely mainly on patient report.

Andrew Pickles

Kings College London

andrew.pickles@kcl.ac.uk

Psychometrics: Item Response Theory for measurement development and cross-cohort measurement calibration.

Modelling child development and developmental epidemiology: structural equation and other modelling methods for repeated multivariate data Therapeutic mechanism in treatment trials: Modelling mediation and moderation pathways in RCTs – primarily of psychological therapies.

Matthew Hickman

University of Bristol

Matthew.Hickman@bristol.ac.uk

Full range of population health sciences (public health, epidemiology, statistics, data science, modelling, health economics, evidence synthesis, health technology appraisal, qualitative methods, genetic and ‘omic epidemiology, behavioural science

Stavros Petrou

University of Warwick

S.Petrou@warwick.ac.uk

StavrosPetrou is an NIHR Senior investigator, associate director and health economist working within the Warwick Clinical Trials Unit, University of Warwick. His main research interests revolve around methodological and applied research that broadly falls under the umbrella of health economic evaluation. He would be able to supervise potential applicants wanting to develop expertise in aspects of health economic evaluation, including trial and model-based economic evaluations, and alternative preference-based approaches to outcomes measurement.

Ian Chetter

Judith Cohen

Hull York Medical School

Claire.Acey@hey.nhs.uk

Clinical trials in exercise interventions, new and emerging applications of technology and surgical wounds

Reiko Heckel

University of Leicester

rh122@leicester.ac.uk

Biomedical informatics, which includes data science and analytics, data management and human computer interaction.

Caroline Sabin

University College London

c.sabin@ucl.ac.uk

I am a medical statistician/epidemiologist with experience in the analysis of longitudinal studies, particularly in the field of HIV and/or sexual health. But I can also support medical statisticians/epidemiologists/clinicians interested in working on clinical research projects within the broader area of infectious diseases.

 

Health Economics Masters

Host/Individual

Organisation

Contact

Areas able to support

Victoria Serra-Sastre

City, University of London

v.serra-sastre@city.ac.uk

Health economics with a focus on the use of applied microeconometric methods

AkiTsuchiya

University of Sheffield

a.tsuchiya@sheffield.ac.uk

The University of Sheffield hosts the MSc in Economics and Health Economics.

We conduct research in wide areas of health economics including: the valuation of health, the analysis of health policy, welfare and equity, technology appraisal, evidence synthesis, econometrics and information sciences.

MSc Economics and Health Economics: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/economics/masters/courses/msc_economics_health/ind ex

Heath Economics and Decision Science section, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr/sections/heds

Luigi Siciliani Andrew Jones

University of York

luigi.siciliani@york.ac.uk

andrew.jones@york.ac.uk

Luigi Siciliani is a of Health Economics at the Department of Economics and Related Studies at the University of York, where he directs the MSc in Health Economics. He has specialised in health economics and micro-econometrics with a focus on healthcare providers. His research interests include waiting times for non-emergency treatment, hospital quality competition, contracting theory applied to health care, pay for performance and coordination between health and social care.

Andrew Jones is of Economics at the University of York, UK. He does research in microeconometrics and health economics with particular interests in the determinants of health, the economics of addiction and socioeconomic inequalities in health and health care.

Tracy Roberts

University of Birmigham

T.E.ROBERTS@bham.ac.uk

We run two MSc programmes one MSc Health Economics and Health Policy and MSc Health Economics and Econometrics. We are interested in supervising anything related to health economics and have specific expertise in methods modelling, econometrics and methods for valuing outcomes and dis-utilities associated with screening but have a broad team with specific expertise in a range of clinical areas and methods and who are happy to support a full range of Health economics related research.

 

Medical Statistics Masters

Host/Individual

Organisation

Contact

Areas able to support

Stephanie Hubbard

University of Leicester

sjh62@le.ac.uk

mscmedstats@le.ac.uk

The Biostatistics research group at Leicester run the MSc in Medical Statistics. Methods/areas we would be able to support include: Survival Analysis; Health Technology Assessment; Health Economic Decision Modelling; Clinical Trials Methodology; Machine Learning; Analysis of linked Electronic Health Record (HER) data (“Big Data”), Causal Inference/Estimating Treatment Effects from Observational/Non-Randomised Data; Bayesian Methods in HTA & Clinical Trials; and Visualisation of statistical concepts, data and analyses results (https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/health-sciences/research/biostats). We have collaborations across many clinical and related disciplines with particularly strong collaboration in cancer, cardiovascular disease, public health and diabetes. The Genetic Epidemiology research group also contribute to the teaching and could provide support in the statistical methodology and computation development motivated by complex problems in genetics.

Deborah Costain

University of Lancaster

d.costain@lancaster.ac.uk

Analysis of longitudinal and survival data, spatial data analysis and methods for casecontrol studies

Kathy Baisley

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Kathy.Baisley@lshtm.ac.uk

Current areas of methodological research that the LSHTM Medical Statistics department would be able to support include: missing data, especially in longitudinal studies; propensity scores and other methods of adjustment for confounders; methods for causal inference (e.g. mediation analyses, methods for time-varying confounding adjustment); time-updated models relating disease events/biomarkers to prognosis; development of user-friendly prognostic risk scores; allowance for measurement error; small sample inference for mixed models. Methodological research in clinical trials includes: adaptive designs; non-inferiority trials and surrogate endpoints; cross-over trials; multiplicity of data (e.g. subgroup analyses, composite endpoints, repeated measures) in trials; statistical methods for the evaluation of complex interventions.