New £3.9m study to see if asprin can help prevent heart attacks and strokes in kidney patients

New £3.9m study to see if asprin can prevent heart attacks and strokes in kidney patients

Date: 03 November 2017

THE NIHR is funding a new £3.9m trial to determine whether aspirin should be prescribed to people with kidney disease to help prevent heart attacks and strokes.

The study, led by researchers at Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust, is being co-funded by the British Heart Foundation and is thought to be the largest study of its kind in kidney patients.

The team is looking to recruit 23,000 people across the country in order to determine if a low dose of aspirin should be used to prevent a first heart attack and stroke in people with chronic kidney disease. The study will be known as ‘Aspirin To Target Arterial Events in Chronic Kidney Disease’ (ATTACK).

Dr Hugh Gallagher, who is leading the trial, said: “It is estimated that there are at least five million people with chronic kidney disease in the UK, and although only a minority will develop kidney disease of such severity that dialysis or a transplant is required, all are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (a general term for conditions including heart attack, angina and stroke).

“Finding new ways to reduce cardiovascular risk is perhaps the most important task facing renal researchers internationally. Aspirin is a familiar and inexpensive intervention and there is some evidence that people with kidney disease may particularly stand to benefit, but there is also the potential for extra risks of bleeding.

“We believe that around one million people with chronic kidney disease who do not have cardiovascular disease are now prescribed aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke whereas three million are not, reflecting the current uncertainty.
 
“To find out whether aspirin is effective and safe in this group, collaboration is needed between primary care, public health and hospital specialists.”

They are working closely with Professor Paul Roderick and Professor Michael Moore from the University of Southampton, plus other experts from primary care, renal medicine, cardiology and gastroenterology.

The study follows a recommendation from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in 2014 that a definitive trial of aspirin in CKD was needed, and the team from St Helier, Southampton, Nottingham, Derby, Kent, Warwick and Durham have been working together to develop the research plan over the last three years. ATTACK is sponsored by the University of Southampton.

Recruitment is expected to begin in the summer of 2018, and the trial is scheduled to finish in 2025.

More information on the study is available on the NIHR Journals Library.

  • Summary:
    THE NIHR is funding a new £3.9m trial to determine whether aspirin should be prescribed to people with kidney disease to help prevent heart attacks and strokes.
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  • Areas of the site this news is applicable to:
    • Funding
    • Research
  • LCRN:
    • East Midlands
    • Kent, Surrey and Sussex
    • Wessex
    • West Midlands
    • Yorkshire and Humber
  • Year of publication:
    2017
  • Specialty:
    • Cardiovascular Disease
    • Critical Care
    • Renal Disorders
    • Stroke
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    • Research and Impact


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